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Lambeau Field


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Name:
Lambeau Field
Address: 1265 Lombardi Ave., Green Bay, WI, 54304

Inauguration: 29 September 1957

First match: Green Bay-Chicago Bears (21-17)
Cost: $960,000
Capacity: 72,600 seats

Team: Green Bay Packers

Inauguration:
1919

Team colours: Green, Gold & White

Postal address:

Green Bay Packers

P.O. Box 10628

Green Bay, WI 54307-0628

Tel:
920-569-7500
Fax:
920-569-7301

Lambeau Field is the home stadium of the NFL’s Green Bay Packers. Originally opened in 1957 as City Stadium, it replaced Green Bay’s original City Stadium as the Packers’ home field. For that reason, it was also informally known as New City Stadium until 1965, when it was renamed for Packers founder E.L. (Curly) Lambeau following his death.

Lambeau Field was the first stadium built for the exclusive use of an NFL team, and is the longest continuously-occupied stadium in the NFL.

Construction

In 1955, the other owners in the league had threatened to force a move to Milwaukee if the stadium conditions in Green Bay were not improved. In 1956, Green Bay voters responded by approving (70.3%) a bond issue to finance the new stadium. The original cost in 1957 was $960,000 (paid off in 1978) and its seating capacity was 32,500.

The site, bordered on three sides by the village of Ashwaubenon, was selected because it had a natural slope, ideal for creating the bowl shape. The outdoor practice fields (Clarke Hinkle Field and Ray Nitschke Field) and Don Hutson Center are all in Ashwaubenon, as was The Packers Hall of Fame until 2003.

The new City Stadium was officially opened on September 29, 1957, as the Packers beat the Bears 21-17. In a ceremony before the game, the stadium was dedicated by then-Vice President Richard Nixon.

Although they now had a modern facility, the Packers continued their tradition (1934-1994) of playing two or three regular-season games a year at County Stadium in Milwaukee, 120 miles to the south. Beginning in 1995, regular season games were no longer scheduled in Milwaukee and Lambeau Field became their only home field. Former Milwaukee ticket holders receive tickets to a preseason game and games 2 and 5 of the regular season home schedule, in what is referred to as the “Gold package”. Green Bay season ticket holders receive tickets to the remaining home games as part of their “Green package.”

Expansion, 1961-1995

Demand for tickets at the new stadium easily outstripped supply. In 1961, four years after it opened, the stadium’s capacity was increased to 38,669.

Since then, the Packers have been regularly increasing the size of the seating area to accommodate more fans. The bowl was increased to 42,327 in 1963, to 50,852 in 1965 and to 56,263 in 1970, when the stadium was fully enclosed for the first time as the various stands were joined into one continuous oval around the field.

Construction of 72 private boxes in 1985 increased the seating capacity to 56,926, and a 1990 addition of 36 additional boxes and 1,920 theatre-style club seats brought the number to 59,543. In 1995, a $4.7-million project put 90 more private boxes in the previously open north end zone, for the first time giving the stadium the feel of a complete bowl and upping capacity to 60,890.

2003 renovation

By the end of the 1990s, the Packers believed that they needed a more modern facility to remain financially competitive in the NFL. Rather than build a new stadium, Chairman/CEO Bob Harlan and President/COO John Jones unveiled a plan to renovate Lambeau Field in January of 2000. The renovations were to be partially funded by the team, and partially by a 0.5% sales tax in Brown County. Their plan won voter approval in September 2000, and construction began early the following year.

Lambeau Field has been occupied by the Packers longer than any other NFL team has occupied its own current stadium. In 2006, the Packers completed their 50th year at Lambeau, tying the all-time NFL occupancy record set by the Chicago Bears at Wrigley Field (1921-1970). (Soldier Field in Chicago has been the site of a football stadium longer, but was not the home of the Bears until 1971.) In 2007, barring an unexpected event, the Packers will begin their NFL record 51st season at the stadium.

Although the capacity has more than doubled since Lambeau Field was opened, demand for tickets remains high – season tickets have been sold out since 1960, and more than 74,000 names remain on the waiting list.

With the preservation of the seating bowl, Lambeau Field remains true to its past, while still resembling a state-of-the-art facility. It is often referred to as the “crown jewel of the National Football League.”

Driving Directions to Lambeau Field

Coming From the South on Interstate 43:
Take I-43 north to Highway 172 west. Take 172 approximately 6 miles to the Oneida Street/Ashland Avenue exit. Turn left (west) on Pilgrim Way to Oneida Street. Turn right (north) on Oneida Street. Continue north on Oneida Street for approximately 2 miles to stadium.

Alternate route: Turn right (east) on Pilgrim Way and continue to Ashland Avenue. Turn left (north) on Ashland Avenue and continue north to Lombardi Avenue. Turn left (west) on Lombardi Avenue and continue to stadium.

Coming From the South on Highway 41:
Take Highway 41 north to the Lombardi Exit (exit #167). Turn right (east) on Lombardi Avenue and continue for approximately 1.5 miles to stadium.

Alternate route: Exit Highway 172 east (exit #165) and continue to Oneida Street/Ashland Avenue exit. Turn left on Vanderperren Way and continue to Ashland Avenue. Turn left (north) on Ashland Avenue and continue north to Lombardi Avenue. Turn left (west) on Lombardi Avenue and continue to stadium.

Coming From the North on Highway 41/141:
Take 41/141 south to the Lombardi Exit (exit #167). Turn left (east) on Lombardi Avenue and continue for approximately 1.5 miles to stadium.

Alternate route: Exit at Mason Street (exit #168). Turn left (east) on Mason Street and continue to Oneida Street. Turn right (south) on Oneida Street and continue to Lombardi Avenue and stadium.

Coming From the West on Highway 29/32:
Take Highway 29 east to Highway 41 south. Take 41/141 south approximately 1.5 miles to the Lombardi Exit (exit #167). Turn left (east) on Lombardi Avenue and continue for approximately 1.5 miles to stadium.

Alternate route: Exit at Mason Street (exit #168). Turn left (east) on Mason Street and continue to Oneida Street. Turn right (south) on Oneida Street and continue to Lombardi Avenue and stadium.